Monthly Archives: January 2012

Lower Norfolk and Norfolk County Sources: A Select Bibliography

Brayton, John A. Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Volume One, Wills and Deeds, Book D, 1656–1666. Memphis, Tennessee: John A. Brayton, 2007.

___. Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Volume Two, Book C, 1651–1656. Memphis, Tennessee: John A. Brayton, 2010.

Brayton, John Anderson. “A Correction to ‘Daniel Tanner of Norfolk, Virginia, and Canterbury, Kent’.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 48, no. 1 (February 2010): 4.

___. “Daniel Tanner of Norfolk, Virginia, and Canterbury, Kent.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 47, no. 4 (November 2009): 257–261.

Brewster, Ethel W., and Water W. Brewster. Norfolk County, Virginia, Will Book III, 1788–1802. Fredericksburg, Virginia: Ethel W. Walter, 1986.

Brock, R. A. Dr. Virginia and Virginians [Norfolk County]. Richmond, Virginia: H. H. Hardesty, 1888.

Burton, H. W. The History of Norfolk, Virginia. Norfolk, Va: Norfolk Virginian job print, 1877.

Cross, Charles Brinson. The County Court, 1637-1904, Norfolk County, Virginia. Portsmouth, Va.: Printcraft Press, 1964.

D’Aiutolo, Leila Eldridge, and Warren Louis Forsythe. The Descendants of William Moseley, 1605/1606-1655 of Norfolk, Va. Ellensburg, WA (Box 1299, Ellensburg 98926-1299): Warren L. Forsythe, 2000.

Davis, Mary Jane Irwin. “Deeds for Pews, Christ Church, Norfolk, Virginia.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 27, no. 2 (May 1989): 131–137.

Dey, Margaret (Stuart). St. Paul’s Church, 1832, Orginally the Borough Church, 1739, Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk, Virginia. Norfolk, Va: The Altar gulde of St. Paul’s church, 1934.

Forsythe, Warren Louis. Moseley, Mostly Etc. Families Genealogicial Appendix: Apparently Non-Norfolk Lines & Raw Research Notes on Some Readily Available Records. Ellensburg, Washington: Warren L. Forsythe, 2000.

Gable, Sharon Rea, and Truitt M. Bonney. Norfolk County Virginia (Extant) Administrator Bonds 1711–1850. Suffolk, Virginia: private, 2008.

___. Norfolk County Virginia 1844 Tithables. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2008.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Death Records 1904–1910 Compiled from Death Register & Extant Burial Permits. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2009.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Guardian Bonds 1801-1850. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2008.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Lost Wills 1744–1903: Out of the Vault and into the Light. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2011.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Marriage Licenses 1850-1899 (non-white Only). Vol. III. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2008.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Marriage Licenses 1850-1899 (white Only). Vol. I. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2007.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Marriage Licenses 1850-1899 (white Only). Vol. II. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2007.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 4, 1802–1817. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2009.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 5, 1818–April 1836. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2009.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 6, May 1836–November 1868. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2010.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 7, December 1868–November 1884. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2010.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 8, December 1884–January 1897. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2011.

___. Norfolk County Virginia Will Book 9, January 1897–October 1905. Suffolk, Virginia: Sharon Rea Gable and Truitt M. Bonney, 2011.

Hanbury, Elizabeth Baum. Marriages of Norfolk County, Virginia 1851-1865. Vol. V. Cheaspeake, Virginia: Elizabeth Baum Hanbury, 1997.

History of Norfolk City & County: Norfolk & Portsmouth Families & History. Wytheville, Va.: Bookwork and Silverfish, n.d.

James, Edward W. The Lower Norfolk County Antiquary. Vol. 1. Richmond, Virginia: Whittet & Shepperson, 1897.

___. The Lower Norfolk County Antiquary. Vol. 2. Baltimore, Maryland: Friedenwald Company, 1899.

___. The Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary. New York: Peter Smith, 1952.

Kyle, Louisa Venable. The History of Eastern Shore Chapel and Lynnhaven Parish, 1642–1969. Norfolk, Va.: Printed by Teagle & Little, 1969.

Maling, Anne, and Abiatha Willis. The Dozier Family of Lower Norfolk County: A Reference. Norfolk, Va.: Anne Maling and Abiatha Willis, 1986.

Mansfield, Stephen S. Princess Anne County and Virginia Beach: a Pictorial History. Norfolk: Donning Co., 1989.

McIntosh, Charles Fleming. Brief Abstract of Lower Norfolk County and Norfolk County Wills 1637-1710. Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1993.

___. Brief Abstract of Norfolk County Wills 1710-1753. Westminster, Md.: Family Line Publications, n.d.

McVey, Pamela W. Norfolk County, Virginia, Will Book II, 1772–1778. Virginia Beach, Va. (1208 Tanager Trail, Virginia Beach 23451): Pamela W. McVey, 1986.

Meredith, H. Clarkson. Some Old Norfolk Families and Others. Norfolk, Va.: Tidewater Typography Corp.

Norfolk County, Virginia, 1790 Tax List Census. CD-ROM. Williamston, Michigan: Binns Genealogy, 2006.

Norfolk County, Virginia, 1800 Tax List Census. CD-ROM. Williamston, Michigan: Binns Genealogy, 2006.

Parramore, Thomas C., Peter C. Stewart, and Tommy Bogger. Norfolk : the First Four Centuries. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1994.

Pippenger, Wesley E. Index to Virginia Estates, 1800–1865. Vol. 9. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Genealogical Society, 2008.

___. Index to Virginia Estates, 1800–1865. Vol. 10. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Genealogical Society, 2010.

Sams, Conway Whittle. The Conquest of Virginia: The First Attempt; Being an Account of Sir Walter Raleigh’s Colony on Roanoke Island, Based on the Original Records, and Incidents in the Life of Raleigh, 1584-1602. Norfolk, Virginia: Keyser-Doherty printing corporation, 1924.

___. The Conquest of Virginia: The Forest Primeval; an Account, Based on Original Documents, of the Indians in That Portion of the Continent in Which Was Established the First English Colony in America. New York, London: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1916.

___. The Conquest of Virginia: The Second Attempt. Norfolk, Va: Keyser-Doherty Printing Corporation, 1929.

___. The Conquest of Virginia: The Third Attempt 1610–1624. New York: G. P. Putnam’s sons, 1939.

Tarter, Brent. The Order Book and Related Papers of the Common Hall of the Borough of Norfolk, Virginia, 1736-1798. Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1979.

Tombstone Inscriptions of Norfolk County, Virginia. [Chesapeake, Va.]: Published by Norfolk County Historical Society of Chesapeake, Virginia, in cooperation with Great Bridge Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 1979.

Tucker, George Holbert. Abstracts from Norfolk City Marriage Bonds (1797-1850) and Other Genealogical Data. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, Inc., 2001.

___. Norfolk Highlights, 1584-1881. Norfolk, Va: Norfolk Historical Society, 1972.

Wagner, Lon. The Fever. The Virginian-Pilot: Norfolk, Virginia, 2005.

Walker, Emily L. General Index to Deeds, 1646-1780, Norfolk County, Virginia. Norfolk, VA (1330 Willow Wood Dr., Norfolk 23509-1304): E.L. Walker, 1998.

___. General Index to Deeds, 1646–1780, Supplement, Deed Book 4 (1675–1685), Deed Book 5 (1686–1695), Norfolk County, Virginia. Norfolk, VA (1330 Willow Wood Dr., Norfolk 23509-1304): Emily L. Walker, 1999.

___. Norfolk County Birth and Death Register : Register of Births, 1853-1860, 1864-1874; Register of Deaths, 1853-1860, 1864-1870, Norfolk County, Virginia. Norfolk, VA (1330 Willow Wood Dr., Norfolk 23509-1304): E.L. Walker, 1997.

___. Norfolk County Death Register, 1870-1896, Norfolk County, Virginia. Norfolk, VA (1330 Willow Wood Dr., Norfolk 23509-1304): E.L. Walker, 1999.

Walter, Alice Granbery. Borough of Norfolk 1736. n.p.: n.p., 1972.

___. Gaskin Family of Lower Norfolk & Princess Anne Counties, Va. n.p.: n.p., 1968.

___. Happer Family of St. Brides Parish Norfolk County Virginia 1756-1801. n.p.: n.p., 1974.

___. Holmes-Hancock-Hoggard Families of Lower Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties, Virginia, 1623–18th Century. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granberry Walter.

___. Mathias/Matthais Family of Lower Norfolk Co. Virginia. n.p.: n.p., 1983.

___. Original Town of Norfolk, Va. 1682. n.p.: n.p., 1972.

___. The 17th Century Families of John Martin and Thomas Keeling of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia (“Linhaven Pish”, Princess Anne County, Virginia) and the Intermarriages of Both Families. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, 1974.

___. The Etheredge Family of Lower Norfolk County & the Connection to the Thomas Nash Family. n.p.: n.p., n.d.

___. The Hancock Progenitors of Susannah Hanock Wife of Thurmer Hoggard I of Lower Norfolk & Princess Anne Counties, VA., 1607–18th Century. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, 1984.

___. Vestry Book of Elizabeth River Parish, 1749-1761. [New York?], 1967.

___. Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records : Book “A”, 1637-1646 & Book “B”, 1646-1651/2. Baltimore, Md: Clearfield Co, 1994.

___. Virginia Land Patents of the Counties of Norfolk, Princess Anne & Warwick from Patent Books “O” & “6” – 1666 to 1679. Baltimore, Md.: Clearfield Company, Inc., 1993.

___. Wiles-Haggard Connections-in Princess Anne County, Kentucky & Norfolk County, VA. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, n.d.

Walters, John, and Kenneth Wiley. Norfolk Blues : the Civil War Diary of the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues. Shippensburg, PA, USA: Burd Street Press, 1997.

Willis, Abiatha. “The Dozier Family of Lower Norfolk County: The First Generation.” Virginia Tidewater Genealogy Quarterly 25, no. 1 (March 1994): 3–8.

___. “The Dozier Family of Lower Norfolk County: The First Generation.” Virginia Tidewater Genealogy Quarterly 25, no. 2 (June 1994): 81–85.

___. “The Dozier Family of Lower Norfolk County: The First Generation.” Virginia Tidewater Genealogy Quarterly 25, no. 3 (September 1994): 127–132.

Wingo, Elizabeth B. Collection of Unrecorded Wills, Norfolk County, Virginia, 1711-1800. [Norfolk], 1961.

___. Guardian Bonds of Norfolk County, Virginia, 1750-1800. Athens, Ga: Iberian Pub. Co, 1993.

___. Marriages of Norfolk County, Va. (Now City of Chesapeake), 1788, 1793-1817. Vol. II. Norfolk, Virginia: Elizabeth B. Wingo, 1963.

___. Marriages of Norfolk County, Virginia, 1706-1792. Vol. I. Norfolk, Virginia: Elizabeth B. Wingo, 1961.

___. Marriages of Norfolk County, Virginia, 1706-1792. Vol. I. Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

___. Marriages of Norfolk County, Virginia, 1805, 1818-1840. Vol. III. Norfolk, Va. (5916 Powhatan Ave., Norfolk 23508): E.B. Wingo, 1989.

___. Marriages of Norfolk County, Virginia, 1841-1850. Vol. IV. Norfolk, Virginia: Elizabeth B. Wingo, 1997.

___. Norfolk County, Virginia (now Chesapeake City, Virginia), Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Applications for Pensions, Bounty Land Warrants, Heirs of Deceased Pensioners. Norfolk, Va, 1964.

___. Norfolk County, Virginia, Tithables, 1751–1765. Norfolk, Virginia: Mrs. Elizabeth B. Wingo, 1981.

___. Norfolk County, Virginia, Will Book I, 1755–1772. Norfolk, Va. (5916 Powhatan Ave., Norfolk 23508): E.B. Wingo, 1986.

Wingo, Elizabeth B., and W. Bruce Wingo. Norfolk County, Virginia, Tithables, 1730–1750. Norfolk, Virginia: Elizabeth B. Wingo and W. Bruce Wingo, 1979.

Wingo, Mrs. Elizabeth B., and W. Bruce Wingo. Norfolk County, Virginia, Tithables, 1766-1780. Norfolk, Virginia: Mrs. Elizabeth B. Wingo and W. Bruce Wingo, 1985.

Yantis-Schreiner, Netti, and Florene Speakman Love. The Personal Property Tax Lists for the Year 1787 for Norfolk County, Virginia [Also for Norfolk City]. Springfield, Virginia: Genealogical Books in Print, 1987.

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Princess Anne County Sources: A Select Bibliography

Barkley, Carolyn L. Princess Anne County, Virginia Marriage Bonds, 1822-1850. Lovettsville, Va: Willow Bend Books, 1997.

Buried Treasure in Old Princess Anne County, Virginia. [Virginia Beach, Virginia]: Lynnhaven Parish Chapter, N.S.D.A.R., n.d.

Creecy, John Harvie. Princess Anne County Loose Papers. Richmond: Dietz Press, 1954.

___. “Thorowgood Family of Princess Anne County.” The Virginia Genealogist, (October–December 1973): 277-287.

___. Viginia Antiquary Volume 1: Princess Anne County Loose Papers, 1700–1789. Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Book, Inc., 1997.

“Ear Marks, Princess Anne County, 1691–1778.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 44, no. 4 (November 2006): 265–78.

“Ear Marks, Princess Anne County, 1691–1778.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 45, no. 1 (February 2007): 47–62.

Ferebee, E. E., and J. Pendleton Wilson Jr. “Economic and Social Survey of Princess Anne County.” University of Virginia Record Extension Series VII, no. 9, May (1924).

Francis, Phyllis W. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia.” The Virginia Genealogist, (January–March 1972): 3-12.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (July–September 1972): 207-215.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (October–December 1972): 286-291.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (April–June 1972): 119-123.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (July–September 1973): 207-211.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (January–March 1973): 14-20.

___. “Some Lineal Descendants of Captain Adam Thorowgood (1602-1640) Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia (Continued).” The Virginia Genealogist, (April–June 1973): 129-134.

Green, Laurie Boush, and Virginia Bonney West. Old Churches, Their Cemeteries and Family Graveyards of Princess Anne County, Virginia. Virginia Beach Virginia: Laurie Boush Green and Virginia Bonney West, 1985.

Harris, Kenneth. Princess Anne County, Virginia: Its Contributions and Sacrifices to the War Between the States. Maximilian Press hardcover ed. Chesapeake  Va.: Maximilian Press Publishers, 2010.

Kellam, Sadie Scott, and Vernon Hope Kellam. Old Houses in Princess Anne, Virginia. Portsmouth, Va.: Printcraft Press Inc., 1931.

Kyle, Louisa Venable. The History of Eastern Shore Chapel and Lynnhaven Parish, 1642–1969. Norfolk, Va.: Printed by Teagle & Little, 1969.

Maling, Anne. Guardian Accounts of Princess Anne County, Virginia. Bowie, Md: Heritage Books, 1997.

___. Princess Anne County, Virginia Deeds, Wills, and Guardianships. Heritage Books, n.d.

___. Princess Anne County, Virginia Wills, 1783-1871. Bowie, Md: Heritage Books, 1994.

___. Princess Anne County, Virginia, Land and Probate Records : Abstracted from Deed Books One to Eighteen, 1691-1783. Bowie, Md: Heritage Books, 1995.

Mansfield, Stephen S. Princess Anne County and Virginia Beach: a Pictorial History. Norfolk: Donning Co., 1989.

Mason, George Carrington. The Colonial Vestry Book of Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1723-1786. Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 2004.

Moore, Donald W. “Garrison Family Bible, Princess Anne County.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 48, no. 4 (November 2010): 335–336.

Pippenger, Wesley E. Index to Virginia Estates, 1800–1865. Vol. 9. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Genealogical Society, 2008.

___. Index to Virginia Estates, 1800–1865. Vol. 10. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Genealogical Society, 2010.

Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1790 Tax List Census. CD-ROM. Williamston, Michigan: Binns Genealogy, 2006.

Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1800 Tax List Census. CD-ROM. Williamston, Michigan: Binns Genealogy, 2006.

Slatten, Richard. “A Return of Tithables and Other Taxable Property, Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1784.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 27, (November 1989): 264–267.

___. “A Return of Tithables and Other Taxable Property, Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1784.” Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 28, no. 1 (February 1990): 29–36.

The Colonial Vestry Book of Lynnhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1723-1786. Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 2004.

Turner, Florence Kimberly. Gateway to the New World : a History of Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1607-1824. Easley, S.C: Southern Historical Press, 1984.

Virginia Beach Genealogical Society. Princess Anne County, Virginia, Deed Books 19, 20 & 21 1783-1790. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Virginia Beach Genealogical Society, 2009.

Virginia Land Patents of the Counties of Norfolk, Princess Anne & Warwick from Patent Books “O” & “6” – 1666 to 1679. Baltimore, Md.: Clearfield Company, Inc., 1993.

Walter, Alice Granbery. Gaskin Family of Lower Norfolk & Princess Anne Counties, Va. n.p.: n.p., 1968.

___. Genealogical Abstracts of Princess Anne County, Va. Court Records from Deed Books 6 & 7 and Minute Books 6 & 7 1740-1762. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, Inc., 1996.

___. Haggard, Hoggart, Hoggard, &c in Goochland, Albemarle Counties, Virginia, Clark County, Kentucky and Princess Anne County, Virginia. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter.

___. Haggards to Wiles in Albemarle County, Clark County, Kentucky and Princess Anne County, Virginia. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter.

___. Holmes-Hancock-Hoggard Families of Lower Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties, Virginia, 1623–18th Century. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granberry Walter.

___. Lynnhaven Parish Register 1838-1913. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, 1986.

___. The 17th Century Families of John Martin and Thomas Keeling of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia (“Linhaven Pish”, Princess Anne County, Virginia) and the Intermarriages of Both Families. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, 1974.

___. The Hancock Progenitors of Susannah Hanock Wife of Thurmer Hoggard I of Lower Norfolk & Princess Anne Counties, VA., 1607–18th Century. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter, 1984.

___. The Hoggards of Poplar Hall, 1654-1986 and in Warwick & Princess Anne Counties, Virginia. Virginia Beach, Va. (4004 Atlantic Ave., Virginia Beach 23451): A.G. Walter, 1988.

___. Wiles-Haggard Connections-in Princess Anne County, Kentucky & Norfolk County, VA. Virginia Beach, Virginia: Alice Granbery Walter.

Wingo, Elizabeth B. Marriages of Princess Anne County (Now Virginia Beach) Virginia, 1799-1821. Vol. II. Norfolk, Virginia: Elizabeth B. Wingo, 1968.

___. Marriages of Princess Anne County, Virginia, 1749-1821. [Norfolk? Va], 1978.

Yantis-Schreiner, Netti, and Florene Speakman Love. The Personal Property Tax Lists for the Year 1787 for Princess Anne County, Virginia. Springfield, Virginia: Genealogical Books in Print, 1987.

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Confederate Veterans in the Moore Family Cemetery

There are four Confederate veterans buried in the Moore family cemetery near Pungo in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

William H. Moore was born about 1835/7 the son of my great-great grandfather Andrew Moore and his first wife Margaret Malbone. William was a farmer before the Civil War. He was about twenty-six years old in 1862 when he enlisted as a private in Company C, 14th (Burroughs) Battalion, Virginia Cavalry. The 14th battalion was assigned to Daniel’s Brigade from June to July, and Ransom’s Brigade from July through September of 1862. During that time, the battalion saw action at the battles of the Seven Days from June 25 through July 1, and Malvern Hill on June 30. The 14th Battalion was subsequently incorporated into the 15th Virginia Cavalry on September 11, 1862. William H. Moore was present with the regiment from March through August of 1863. During that time, the regiment was assigned to W.H.F. Lee’s Cavalry Brigade and saw action at the battles of Chancellorsville  on May 1–5, Middleburg on June 19, and Gettysburg on July 1–3. That is the extent of his military records. After the war, William returned to his wife and children in Princess Anne County and continued farming. He died there in 1881.

James M. Malbone was born in 1828 the son of my great-great grandaunt Elizabeth Moore and her husband James Malbone. In 1850 he was a private tutor to a Princess Anne County family. He was about thirty-four years old in 1862 when he enlisted in Company B of the 6th Virginia Infantry. Shortly thereafter, he was elected 2nd Lieutenant from the ranks and probably served with the regiment during the battles of the Seven Days and Malvern Hill from June 25 to July 1, 1862. From September through November of 1862, he was a patient in General Hospital No. 7 at Richmond, Virginia, with jaundice. After returning to duty, he was with the regiment from November through December of 1862 in camp near Fredericksburg and probably participated in the battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. 2nd Lt. James M. Malbone was wounded on May 3, 1863, during the battle of Chancellorsville, and suffered a partial fracture of the humerus of the right arm, probably from a minnie ball. From May of 1863 through February of 1864, he was absent sick in Richmond, spending part of that time in General Hospital No. 4. In April of 1864, he was ordered to light duty on detached service. He spent much of the remainder of the war, from April through October of 1864, at Gordonsville with a brief stay at the Wilcox farm in August. In February of 1865, he was still on detached duty at the Van Pelt farm near Petersburg. There is no indication in his military records whether the arm was amputated as a result of his wound. But given the length of time he spent in convalesence and light duty, there is no doubt it was more than just a broken arm. James M. Malbone returned to Princess Anne County after the war where he served as a Commissioner of Chancery and school teacher. He was a charter member of the original Princess Anne Camp #96, United Confederate Veterans. James M. Malbone never married and never had any children. He died in 1912.

James Moore was born in 1813, the son of my great-great-great grandfather William Moore and his wife Elizabeth Gornto. James was a farmer. He and his wife Catherine raised a family of five children before she died in 1857. He was about forty-seven years old when the war broke out three years later. Several of his relatives posted bond as guardians of his five children, probably so that he could enlist in 1862 as a private in Company F, 16th Virginia Infantry. He was present for duty from April until September of that year and probably served with the regiment at the battles of Seven Days from June 25 to July 1; Malvern Hill on July 1; and 2nd Bull Run from August 28–30. He deserted, however, near Manassas on September 10 just before the battle of South Mountain. James was back with the regiment and present for duty from April through August 1864 and probably saw action during the Wilderness campaign on May 5–6; Spottsylvania Court House on May 8–21; North Anna on May 22-26; Cold Harbor on June 1–3; the Petersburg Seige in June; and the Crater in July. He was admitted to Chimborazo Hospital No. 1 in August with dyspepsia, and returned to duty a few weeks later. James returned to Princess Anne County and his children after the war, but died soon afterwards in December of 1870.

Enoch Petree was a Moore son-in-law. He was born in 1829 and married my great-great grandaunt Eliza (Moore) Jackson as her second husband. Enoch was a farmer before the war. He enlisted at about the age of thirty-three at the same time as William H. Moore and served with him in the same regiment. In 1863, Enoch was admitted to General Hospital No. 9 and transferred the next day to Chimborazo Hospital No. 1, where he was admited on 28 November with cataarh. He returned to duty on 6 January 1863. There are no further records until April 19, 1864, when Enoch was admitted to General Hospital No. 9 and then transferred on April 20 to Chimborazo Hospital No. 1. He was present there from April through August 1864. There his military records end. After the war, Enoch returned to his wife and family in Princess Anne County, where he continued farming. He died in 1899.

There are three other Confederate veterans who are connected to the Moore family but not buried in the Moore cemetery.

Napoleon B. Moore was born in 1833, the son of my great-great-grandfather Andrew Moore and his first wife Margaret Malbone. He served as 2nd Lt. in Burroughs Battalion of Partisan Rangers. After the war, he ran a general store, served in various elected county offices, was postmaster at Pleasant Ridge, and a customs inspector in Norfolk. He died in Norfolk in 1895 and is buried at Pleasant Ridge on Princess Anne Road.

Theodorick L. Moore was born in 1844, another son of my great-great grandfather Andrew Moore and his second wife Anne Flanagan. He served as a private in Burroughs Battalion of Partisan Rangers, probably because he was only 16 and underage when the war broke out. Later, he served with Company G, 5th Virginia Cavalry, in Paynes brigade of Fitz Lee’s Cavalry division. He was captured in 1864 near Harrisonburg and spent time as a POW in Fort McHenry and Point Lookout before being paroled to Princess Anne County after Lee’s surrender. He lived in Norfolk after the war, where he married, raised a family, and joined the Pickett-Buchanan Camp, United Confederate Veterans. He died in 1924 and is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery in Norfolk.

Another Moore son-in-law, Emperor M. James was the husband of my half great grandaunt Minerva Anne Moore. He served in the same regiment with William H. Moore and Enoch Petree. He died in 1888 and is buried at Nimmo Church.

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Moore Family Cemetery

The Moore cemetery and the surrounding farmland near the intersection at Pungo in Virginia Beach, Virginia, have been in the Moore family since at least 1789. Click here to see a cemetery map.

On the 7th of November 1789, Cason Moore wrote his will, leaving to his son Tully Moore “…that part of my estate which [he] already had in [his] possession….”[1] That part of his estate was fifty-one acres of land that Cason had given his son Tully on 20 January 1789 by deed of gift.[2]

Tully Moore did not long survive his father. Tully wrote his will on the 31st of August 1794, leaving to his wife Elizabeth “…the land whereon I now live dureing her widowhood and at the end of her widowhood I give the said land to my son William Moore….”[3] The fifty-one acres that Tully received from his father now passed to Tully’s son William Moore, my 3rd great grandfather.

By 1821, William had acquired an additional twenty-three acres of land for a total of seventy-three acres, for which he began paying taxes in that year. The land was described in the tax records as located in Pungo, four miles southeast of the court house.[4] William Moore lived a long life and did not write his will until the 12th of February 1842, leaving to “…my son James Moore the west end of my plantation…” and to “…my son William Moore the eastern end of my plantation….” [5] His two sons James and William each inherited 36.5 acres. William did not give land to his three other children Betsey, Eliza, and Andrew. [6]

James Moore, who died in 1870, passed his 36.5 acres to his son Joshua G. Moore. Joshua was alive as late as 1920, but his date of death and burial are not known, and he did not leave a recorded will. His only son Joshua Dey Moore, who was apparently not interested in farming, moved to Norfolk sometime before 1930. The farm eventually came into the possession of his sister Stella and her husband Joshua Clay James, whom she married in 1904. It was at this point that the property and the cemetery passed out of the Moore family.

There are conflicting stories about how the Moore family lost the property. What is known is that Joshua Clay James borrowed money from brothers Oscar and Simon Land and probably used the farm as collateral. When he defaulted on the loan, Oscar and Simon Land took possession of the farm. Their houses stand within site of the cemetery, and their children are the co-owners of the property to this day.

My 3rd great grandfather William Moore, who died in 1843, is the oldest known burial in the Moore family cemetery. He is also the person with the earliest birth date, 13 May 1773. Enoch Petree, who died in 1899, is the last known burial. There are twenty-six known persons buried in the cemetery, twenty-three of whom are descendants or in-laws of William Moore. They are:

his wife Elizabeth Moore
three sons Andrew Moore, William Moore, and James Moore
two daughters Eliza Petree and Elizabeth Malbone
five grandsons James E. Moore, Charles T. Moore, Cason Moore, William. H. Moore, and James M. Malbone
three great grandsons Cason Moore, Henry H. Leggett, and Jas. E. Leggett
four great granddaughters Ellen Moore, Hannah P. Moore, Ada E. Petree, and Rosia May Petree
one son-in-law Enoch Petree
two daughters-in-law Catherine (Malbone) Moore and Elizabeth (Bonney) Moore
two granddaughters-in-law Elizabeth W. (Cason) Moore and Hettie (Bouchell) Moore

There are four Confederate veterans buried in the Moore family cemetery, all of whom survived and returned to their families after the war:

James M. Malbone 2nd Lieutenant, Company B, 6th Virginia Infantry
James E. Moore Private, Company F, 16th Virginia Infantry
William H. Moore Private, Company C, 15th Virginia Cavalry
Enoch Petree Private, Company C, 15th Virginia Cavalry

[1] Cason Moore Senr will (1789), Princess Anne County Will Book 1: 168-169, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

[2] Cason Moore Senr deed (1789), Princess Anne County Deed Book 21: 80, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

[3] Tully Moore will (1794), Princess Anne County Will Book 2: 79-80, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

[4] William Moore entry (1821-1843), Princess Anne County Land Tax Book: unpaginated; in Princess Anne County Land Tax Books 1786, 1805-1807, 1809-1817 volume 1, Virginia State Library microfilm publication 263; Central Library, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

[5] William Moore will (1842), Princess Anne County Will Book 4: 274-275, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

[6] William Moore will (1842), Princess Anne County Will Book 4: 274-275, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Copyright © 2012 Donald W. Moore. All rights reserved. May not be used without written permission.

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Princess Anne County Families: David Barnes

My great-great grandfather David Barnes was born in Princess Anne County on September 29, 1843, the second of seven children born to John Barnes and Catherine Bonney. Their other children were two daughters, Elenora and Eliza, and four sons, Emperor, Henry, John, and Walter.

David spent his youth working on the family farm, where he was enumerated in the 1850 and 1860 census. But the Civil War was looming ever. On March 1, 1862 when David was nineteen years old, he enlisted for the duration of the war in Company G of the 16th Virginia Infantry at Tanners Creek Crossroads in what was then Norfolk County. Tanners Creek was the original name of the modern day Lafayette River. Tanners Creek Crossroad was near what is now the intersection of Little Creek, Old Ocean View, and Sewells Point roads. Company G, also known as the Atlantic Guard, was a local company from Princess Anne County commanded by Capt. William E. Williams and Capt. John T. Woodhouse, later promoted to Major.

The war was heating up in the Hampton Roads area in the months just before David enlisted. In January 1862 Gen. Burnside arrived with Federal troops at Fort Monroe and sent a force to capture Roanoke Island, North Carolina. As a result, CSA President Jefferson Davis declared martial law in a ten-mile radius around Norfolk and Portsmouth, and ordered all males between the age of eighteen and forty-five to report for duty. This is probably the reason David enlisted. Then on March 8, the Monitor and CSS Virginia fought their famous engagement in Hampton Roads harbor.

David’s muster rolls show that he was present for duty with the 16th Virginia for almost the entire war, except for two occasions. The first was on July 1, 1862, when he was wounded at Malvern Hill and sent to hospital in Richmond. The second was on February 23, 1863, when he was admitted to General Hospital No. 9 in Richmond.

The 16th Virginia was involved in almost every engagement of the Army of Northern Virginia beginning with the Seven Days in 1862 and ending with the Petersburg siege in 1864–65 and the retreat to Appomattox in April 1865. David was probably with the 16th for battles of 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg in 1862; for Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863; for the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg in 1864. But David was definitely there for the Battle of the Crater.

In the summer of 1864, the Army of Northern Virginia lay entrenched around Petersburg, holding Grant from taking the city and cutting the railroad lines. To break the impasse, Union forces secretly dug tunnels under part of the Confederate lines and packed them with 8,000 pounds (four tons) of gunpowder. On July 30, the Federals lit the fuse. The explosion killed about 300 Confederate soldiers and created a crater roughly 170 feet long, 70 feet wide, and 30 feet deep—the size of a football field. Union forces then attacked with a mortar and heavy artillery barrage, followed by an advance of 15,000 men—an entire army corps.

The 16th and other regiments of Mahone’s brigade were entrenched about three miles south of the Crater when they were ordered to counter attack. Once within site of the Crater, they formed a battle line 200 yards wide and twenty feet deep, fixed bayonets, and charged. The fighting was brutal and hand-to-hand. There is a scene in the movie “Cold Mountain” that graphically depicts what it must have been like.

David Barnes not only survived the battle, but captured a Union Stars and Stripes during the fighting. For that achievement, he was added to the Confederate Roll of Honor.

The Army of Northern Virginia remained entrenched around Petersburg for the rest of 1864 and into the early months of 1865. David was probably with the 16th on March 3, 1865, when it returned to the Petersburg defenses with the rest of Mahone’s division after confronting Union forces on the Boydton Plank Road. According to his military records, David deserted that same day. Perhaps he saw the handwriting on the wall. Only a month later, Lee evacuated Petersburg and began the last march of the Army of Northern Virginia to Appomattox. On March 18, two weeks after he deserted, David took the oath of allegiance and was transported to Norfolk.

David was about twenty-seven years old when he married my great-great grandmother Sarah Virginia “Jennie” Widgeon on February 28, 1870. She was the daughter of Henry A. Widgeon and Martha Louise Petty. Three of Jennie’s brothers—Charles, Henry, and John—married three sisters—Margaret, Elizabeth, and Mary—the daughters of Andrew and Susan (Gallup) Shipp, my first cousin three times removed. Andrew was also a Confederate veteran. The local Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 1993 (now 484) restored their graves several years ago.

David was a farmer his entire life. He and Jennie lived on London Bridge Road. My mother believes the house was near the curve where the Lillian Vernon warehouse is located today. London Bridge road at that time was straighter, probably continuing across Oceana Air Field from its back gate to the Lillian Vernon warehouse location. David and Jennie had a large family: eight sons and one daughter. All but one survived to adulthood.

David died on March 2, 1921 at the age of seventy-seven. His wife Jennie passed away in 1944 at the age of ninety-seven. My mother was twenty at the time and still remembers her quite well. David and Jennie were buried at London Bridge Baptist Church. When the Norfolk-Virginia Beach toll road (I-264 east) was built in the 1960s, the State took some of the cemetery property where they were buried. Consequently, the Barnes family moved David and Jennie in 1966 to Forest Lawn Cemetery in Norfolk.

Copyright © 2012 Donald W. Moore. All rights reserved. May not be used without written permission.

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